Growth Stock Stocking Stuffers

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Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Somehow, 2007 is almost over already, and all I can think about is money... As in holiday shopping and flexible spending accounts and taxes and the crazy markets and when the battery in my car might die. In times like these, we turn to the Motley Fool for answers (maybe not the car battery, but everything else). As we come up on 2008, what should you keep in mind in terms of your portfolio? Is it time for a tune-up? Turns out giving stock away might make a lot of sense. And, with everyone filling the malls and online stores, should you drop some retail stocks into your stocking? David Gardner is back to talk money. And, if my math is right, Neal still has $1,000 in faux cash to spend on his fantasy portfolio. Got any advice on where to put it?

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I completely agree with David regarding - people should be responsible for their actions. Bailing out people who make poor choices teaches "It is okay to take a chance, I don't have to be responsible for my actions / choices". At the same time, I understand that my property value will decrease but in the long run, values will level out and become more reasonable. I live in California where the property values are 'unrealistic'. This keeps these values at this unrealistic value.

Sent by Diane | 2:57 PM | 12-6-2007

When the market was hot, I looked into switching from renting to buying and easily qualified for a loan. Unlike most of the people in foreclosure right now, I did the math and realized when the rate change kicked in, I wouldn't be able to afford the payments.

I'm still renting and I think anyone who didn't do the math shouldn't be rewarded for their laziness through my taxes. I have always lived by my family's first lesson: You never get something for nothing. If something seems too good to be true, it probably is.

Sent by JKB | 10:00 AM | 12-7-2007