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Nigella Express

Nigella Express

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Nigella Lawson: relaxed home cooking. Source: Lis Parsons hide caption

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Source: Lis Parsons

I don't know about you, but my days are so jam-packed with all the have-to's of the daily grind — work, gym, emails, staring at my reflection adoringly in the mirror,* that I barely have enough time to sleep much less eat. Actually, that's not entirely true. I do eat. I just don't eat well. Much to my chagrin, Top Ramen, which I thought would fade away along with my college years, is still a staple; and I'd be lying if I didn't admit that those gloriously delectable Trader Joe's bite-sized brownies, which fellow producer Susan Lund bequeaths to the TOTN staff every so often, have stood in place of dinner on more than one occasion. I eat these things not because I'm cheap, but because they're fast and easy: I just don't have enough time to prepare a scrumptious, healthy feast every night. But I'm always left feeling unsatisfied. So, as part of my New Year's resolution, I've decided to make eating well a top priority. Thankfully, Nigella Lawson, TV personality, best-selling author, and cooking guru extraordinaire, is here to talk to us today about how to impress the palate without all the fuss. Her new book Nigella Express offers 130 quick recipes for those who love to cook, but have little time to do it.

* Only half-joking.