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Prayer and Your PC

Prayer and Your PC

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Burmese monks online. Source: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Source: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

The Internet has long been lauded for its ability to bring the world to your fingertips. It's a place where you can shop for the necessary and the superfluous; connect with friends old and new; and learn about everything from the weekly weather forecast to the dynamics of event horizons. So it was only a matter of time before the Web became a place for prayer as well. In Second Life, people (via their avatars) now have the opportunity to create churches, synagogues and mosques to further their religious expression. Almost all walks of faith are represented — Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Wicca, you name it — in this new venue of spiritual support. Today we'll talk to one woman* who founded the Temple Beth Israel in Second Life. And we're curious about what else is out there; so, tell us, how do you use the Internet to practice your faith?

* A note from fellow producer, Marina:

Finding guests for our show requires some creativity. For our online religion show, we knew we wanted Beth Brown — she heads a thriving Jewish community in Second Life — but we couldn't find her. There are over 400 'Beth Browns' in Dallas, and we weren't about to call 400 people and interrogate them about their online identities. So, we went looking for her in Second Life. And we found her! She thought it was a bit creepy, and we agree. But that's the lengths we go to bring you great guests.
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