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The Oprah Effect

The Oprah Effect

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Stumping for Obama. Source: Joe Crimmings Photography hide caption

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Source: Joe Crimmings Photography

It's been interesting to see the reaction to Oprah's latest stumping for Obama. Mary Mitchell wrote in the Chicago Sun-Times, "Oprah Winfrey may be just what Barack Obama needs to push him over the top in South Carolina." Her fellow columnist at the Sun-Times, Richard Roeper, had an interesting take: Don't underestimate the Oprah effect!

If Oprah went on her show tomorrow and said the ultimate key to inner peace is to pretend you're a dog instead of saying hello when you greet other people, you wouldn't get through your day without somebody greeting you with a "Woof! Woof!" while sniffing your ankles.

On the flip-side, Stanley Crouch wrote in the New York Daily News,

In the end, I doubt that she will get that many black or female voters to give Clinton the hot-potato routine. Obama's campaign should not overestimate her influence. Oprah is persuasive and she is powerful, but it is unlikely she can convince many primary voters that it is worth rejecting Clinton and embracing Obama.

We'll talk with NPR's Ken Rudin, and with NPR's Juan Williams on the show today. The big question on the table: Will there be an Oprah effect among democrats, particularly among black voters?

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