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And the Winner Isn't...

And the Winner Isn't...

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Polls made a mess of things Tuesday night. Source: Getty Images/Mario Tama hide caption

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Source: Getty Images/Mario Tama

OK, everyone who thought Hillary Clinton was going to win the New Hampshire primary, say "yea." In a room full of pollsters, all you'll hear is crickets. Just about every one of them called for a comfortable Obama win, and reporters anticipated the subsequent "next big story": a major shakeup in the Clinton camp. Sorry, Charlie. So what went wrong with the polls? Sure, the nice weather may have helped Hillary, whose demographic skews older than Obama's, but that's not enough to account for her surprise win. Pollmaster Andy Kohut says the answer lies in the profile of folks who respond to polls — which is not the same as who votes. It's got a lot more to do with race and class than gender and age, and it may surprise you. Do you respond to polls? Why or why not?