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Pakistan, Al Qaida, and the Taliban

Pakistan, Al Qaida, and the Taliban

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It's been a week since Benazir Bhutto was killed in Pakistan, and investigators are no closer to identifying her killers. Scotland Yard is on the case, though only as technical advisors. And there's plenty of speculation and theories, including an accusation from Pakistan's President Pervez Musharraf that Al Qaida was involved (which work to counter accusations that Pakistan's intelligence service was involved). In news circles when you mention Pakistan and terrorism in the same sentence, Peter Bergen jumps to mind. He constantly travels to Pakistan, reports on radio, TV, newspapers, and magazines, and literally wrote the book on Osama bin Laden, The Osama bin Laden I Know. He's in Pakistan today, and will fill us in on the murky tribal areas of Pakistan's border where it's believed Al Qaida, remnants of the Taliban, and even Osama bin Laden himself roam about.