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Political Dirty Tricks

Political Dirty Tricks

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Say you really wanted to win an election, no holds barred (and no second thoughts about ethics), how would you do it? Allen Raymond worked as a GOP consultant and spent three months in jail for dirty political tricks in New Hampshire in the 2002 election (he now says what he did was wrong, and says he hopes to empty the political bag of dirty tricks). Some of the ideas he mentions in his new book, How to Rig an Election: Confessions of a Republican Operative: Jam your opponents' phone lines on election day (the stunt he did jail time for). Call thousands of voters in the middle of the Super Bowl claiming to represent your opponent. Drum up a phony press release on your opponent's letterhead full of lies and half-truths. And that's just to warm up.
As the race for President really starts to get interesting, we'll talk with Raymond today about his story, and some of the underhanded tactics we might see between now and November.