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Shaky Ground

Shaky Ground

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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In the second hour, we're focusing on upward mobility, especially among African Americans. As Gwen wrote in her post, a new Pew survey from 2007 indicates that "45% of African Americans who were born into middle class families during the 1960s are currently doing worse economically than their parents."

The show centers on one question, which we're asking our audience at Morgan State University in Baltimore, and you, listening to the radio, reading this blog:

Will you do better than your parents?

If your parents scrimped and saved to pave the way for you to go to school, to get a good job, to go to grad. school, to get a better job, did it pay off? And parents, if you scrimped and saved to pave the way for your kids to go to school, to get a good job, to go to grad. school, to get a better job, was it worth it? What worked? And what didn't?

John Morton, Managing Director of Economic Policy at the Pew Charitable Trust, will join us, to take us through those numbers Gwen cited. Who is doing well? Who isn't? Why is that? And why is the "American Dream" so elusive for so many people? And we'll hear from Ellis Cose, a contributing editor and columnist for Newsweek.

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