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Campaign Coverage [So Far]

Campaign Coverage [So Far]

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In the first hour today, we'll look at how media organizations, including NPR, have covered the election.

After the Iowa caucuses, heading into the New Hampshire primaries, reporters, anchors, and analysts relied on data from exit polls that proved to be flat-out wrong.... On Super Tuesday, some news organizations called states before results came in from major cities.... When Senator Edward Kennedy and his niece, Caroline, endorsed Senator Barack Obama at a rally in Washington, DC, images and audio from the event appeared almost everywhere. And there have been complaints about what hasn't been covered: Voters have charged that newspapers and networks didn't cover all the candidates equally. And that questions about issues — including health care, education, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan — have been too-often overshadowed by questions about race and gender.

Tom Rosenstiel, who directs the Project for Excellence in Journalism, will join us. Every Tuesday, his organization publishes a report on how the campaign has been covered. David Folkenflik, NPR's media correspondent — and one-time ringleader of the NPR "Media Circus," will chime in from New York. And Lisa Shepard, our new ombudsman, will answer your questions about NPR's coverage. What haven't you liked about how NPR, newspapers, magazines, networks, and bloggers have covered the campaign? And what would you like to see them do differently in the next nine months?

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