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Cutting Room Floor

Growing Georgia

Georgia's Lake Lanier, a year ago versus now. Source: Brian Hursey hide caption

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Source: Brian Hursey

For some reason, I'm pretty into the Southeast drought story. Briefly, if you're unaware, the Southeast is in its worst drought in more than a century. It's especially bad in Georgia, and the state legislature's got an idea to ease the pain... move the border. Apparently, Georgia and Tennessee have long agreed that the border they've shared for 200 years isn't quite in the right place, that Georgia should extend a bit more than a mile into what's now Tennessee. But no one has ever really cared, until now. Turns out, if Georgia moved the border to reclaim that land, they'd get to tap into an incredibly precious resource: the Tennessee River. It's a huge, important river that could alleviate some of the drought in Georgia... but what of all the Tennesseeans who'd suddenly have new addresses... legislators... schools... identities? Now, I'm biased — I love Georgia, and hate to see her suffer. Plus, Tennessee's flip response was to challege the Dawgs to a football game for the border, and that raises my hackles (though I'm completely confident in a Dawg victory, should the Vols really take the field). And, of course I think Tennesseeans would be lucky to be insta-Georgians. But seriously... what if you woke up one morning, suddenly in a different state, having never left your bed?