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Heavenly Happenings

Heavenly Happenings

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Look for this tonight! Source: fortphoto hide caption

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Source: fortphoto

It is shaping up to be a busy week in outer space. "David, every week is a busy week in outer space," you may say — or post below. I know that. This week just seems to be particularly busy. And definitely more exciting than usual.... There are missiles! Broken satellites! Space shuttles! And eclipses!

The Defense Department plans to shoot down a wayward spy satellite, filled with rocket fuel. If they don't, scientists say — and we're going to trust them on this one — it could crash into Earth. The space shuttle Atlantis returned to the Kennedy Space Center this morning, after a 13-day mission to the International Space Station. (German Astronaut Hans Schlegel, who got sick on the flight, feels better, by the way). And, if it isn't too cloudy, you'll be able to see a lunar eclipse tonight.

We're throwing a sky party in Studio 3A, where, admittedly, the view of the cosmos isn't that great. That's OK. It's the company that matters. Ace reporters David Kestenbaum and Nell Greenfieldboyce will to take your questions. Leave 'em here. And if you have any good tips on how to see a lunar eclipse (what to use, where to go, etc.), we're interested in those, too.