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Making (or Promising) Change in Washington

Making (or Promising) Change in Washington

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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To listen to the political rhetoric these days, you'd think all of Washington, DC is going to be swept out of town, no matter who wins. Democrats and Republicans alike are promising change, and lots of it. In an op-ed for the Los Angeles Times last month, Timothy Noah couldn't help but wonder what that really means:

But why? Since when did "change" become the Holy Grail of American politics — and what can the word possibly mean if all these disparate candidates are for it?

We'll talk with Tim, who writes for Slate.com, about whether or not "change" is as good a reason as any to elect a President.