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Psst! Shhh! Listen!

Psst! Shhh! Listen!

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All ears! Get it? Source: banlon1964 hide caption

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Source: banlon1964

I am a compulsive eavesdropper. I admit this because I think it's fairly harmless — I'm not a gossip*, and I prefer listening to strangers than to people I know. It's like looking in windows at Christmas trees in the winter — I love seeing the snapshot of other people's lives, it makes me feel human. This habit does make me a really annoying dinner partner; I'll often shush my actual dining companion in order to listen to the folks at the next table, ("Shush! I think he's going to propose to her!") But have you ever noticed that the various "overheard" columns often read better than fiction? We're talking to Leah Garchik this hour — she writes the eavesdrop column for the San Fransisco Chronicle, and we want to hear your best overheard conversations. Here's what I heard over the weekend in Whole Foods, from an aggressive, yoga-attired young woman (she hit me with her yoga bag, seriously.) It's not the best overheard line, but the most recent:

"Oh my GOD, Brian, are you kidding? Gluten, sugar, butter — it's like a fat bomb."

Honestly, she could have used a fat bomb. She kind of looked like a piece of celery, only more sour.

*Wait, I might be a gossip actually. At least I like gossip.