Racing on the Street : Blog Of The Nation Street racing is not only dangerous for the drivers, it can also put spectators in peril.
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Racing on the Street

Racing on the Street

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Street racing on public roads: thrill or death wish? Source: Clearly Ambiguous hide caption

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Source: Clearly Ambiguous

I'm not gonna lie — I always thought The Fast and the Furious was a sexy movie, and not just because of Paul Walker. It portrays street racing as this sick* hobbie, with tricked-out rides and loads of heart-pounding adrenaline. Illegal as it may be, it's an underground circuit of which I secretly wished I could be a part, if only I was cool enough.** That is, until I caught wind of a deadly street racing crash in Maryland this past weekend that killed eight spectators and wounded several others. It made me realize, in a way I never had before, how dangerous racing at high speeds can be — for both drivers and onlookers. Today we take a deeper look at street racing, and what's being done to regulate it. If you have any experience with this pastime — either as a racer or a spectator — tell us your story.

* No, "sick" is a good thing, Mom.
** Tear, sigh.