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Stuff White People Like

Stuff White People Like

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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#42, #40, #69, and #60 on Christian Lander's list. Source: iStockPhoto; Scott Barbour, Scott Gries/Getty Images; Toyota/Getty hide caption

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Source: iStockPhoto; Scott Barbour, Scott Gries/Getty Images; Toyota/Getty

In the last two months, nearly 4 million people have visited Christian Lander's blog, Stuff White People Like. If you haven't visited the site, do it. You may enjoy "#44 Public Radio." (We did).

White people love staions [sic] like NPR (which is equivalent to listening to cardboard), and they love shows like This American Life and Democracy Now. This confuses immigrants from the third world. The see the need for radio as a source for sports, top 40 radio and traffic reports but they don't quite understand why people who can afford TVs and have access to Youtube, would spend hours listening to the opinions of overeducated arts majors.

According to Lander, his blog "is a scientific approach to highlight and explain stuff white people like. They are pretty predictable." Here are a few more:

"#75 Threatening to Move to Canada"

"#62 Knowing what's best for poor people"

"#60 Toyota Prius"

Gregory Rodriguez, a columnist for the Los Angeles Times, doesn't just laugh at the site, he deconstructs it: "Lander is gently making fun of the many progressive, educated, upper-middle-class whites who think they are beyond ethnicity or collectively shared tastes, styles or outlook. He's essentially reminding them that they too are part of a group."

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What do you think of it? Are you a regular reader? Do you disagree with what he's written? Do you have recommendations for other stuff he could add?