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Super Tuesday Recap

Super Tuesday Recap

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Studio 4A, NPR: Special Coverage, Super Tuesday. Source: Ashley Grashaw hide caption

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Source: Ashley Grashaw

Turnout among voters was high yesterday in presidential primaries across the country. It seems everyone wanted to weigh in. And every candidate, save for former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, seemed to come away with big wins. Perhaps the most interesting part of the results from last night, however, is the breakdown of who voted for whom, and why. Exit polls give us insight into the demographic support base of each candidate — things like age, race, gender, income, and education levels break along sharp lines among voters. Today we talk to NPR political junkie Ken Rudin; Andy Kohut, director of the Pew Research Center; and political commentators Keli Goff and Luis Clemens about who got which voting blocks, and what this means for their campaigns. What trends did you notice? And why do you think these primaries have stimulated the kind of excitement and participation that's been lacking in elections past?

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