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After All, He's Just a Man

After All, He's Just a Man

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Silda Spitzer stands by her man. Source: Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Source: Chris Hondros/Getty Images

In this office, as we watched Eliot Spitzer's apology for "private failings," the first thing out of most people's mouth was, "Whoa, his wife's there too... I wonder..." My brain went straight to, "He cheated on her! How can she stand by him?" I wasn't alone, but then my boss (there's a reason she's the boss) said, "Wait, hold on, what do we really know about the Spitzers? There could be things going on between them that we don't know about." And she's right, of course — some marriages are open, some have "understandings," and many were quick to point out that in Europe, this would be no big deal. But, still, even if my high-profile man and I had a deal that he could hire call girls and he got busted, I still imagine my response would be more along the lines of "You did the crime, you do the time" than "Stand by Your Man." What do you think? Have you ever stood by your spouse through an incident in which they embarrassed you? Why or why not? Today we'll hear from one former first lady who had to deal with this firsthand.

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