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It's Their Party... They Can Cry If They Want To

It's Their Party... They Can Cry If They Want To

listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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The two words we were talking about yesterday: Texas and Ohio. Today, the two words we keep hearing are Florida and Michigan. As in: The Democratic party stripped Florida and Michigan of its delegates as punishment for moving their primaries to an earlier date, but now want those delegates counted. And the only thing at stake here is the nomination itself. How will it turn out? Who knows. Howard Dean, the head of the Democratic National Committee, was on NPR yesterday, and was asked if Florida and Michigan would eventually have their delegates seated at the convention:

There is a process within the rules. They can come and petition, and give the Rules Committee a new plan for selecting their delegates.... They could appeal to the Credentials Committee.... We don't have any control over that. That's the elected delegates of the convention who'll make that decision.

We'll hear from Florida and Michigan on the show today, and find out how much is at stake here, and whether delegates from either state (or both) will eventually be counted.