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Eat my Dust. And Vote for my Candidate!

Eat my Dust. And Vote for my Candidate!

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/89119759/89119301" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A collector's item! (The sticker, not the car.) teresia hide caption

toggle caption teresia

A few years ago, a friend of mine got into a fender bender. It was no big deal, really. I thought that the damage was aesthetic: a few dents here, a small scratch there. When he took it to a garage, though, a mechanic told him that the whole thing had to be replaced. Bumpers are different than they used to be, he said. They're full of new safety features and sensors. The small wreck cost my friend several hundred bucks.

Bumpers are different these days, aren't they? They're made of plastic, not shiny chrome. And what happened to those bumper stickers that used to cover them? They're gone too. Well, not entirely, but they used to be everywhere. There were joke bumper stickers. They acted as resumes. "Guess where I went to school?!" And they helped us broadcast to the world who we planned to vote for. (Or, in many cases, who we voted for two or three elections ago.)

Our guest at the end of the first hour, Patti Brown, says that the political bumper sticker is alive and well. She has been collecting them — and blogging about them — for a while now.

Do you put political bumper stickers are on your car? Do you have a favorite?

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