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He Didn't Do It [Diddy]

He Didn't Do It [Diddy]

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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The late Tupac Shakur. Source: Getty Images hide caption

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Source: Getty Images

In 1994, rapper Tupac Shakur was attacked in New York City, in the lobby of Quad Recording Studios. Two years later, he was shot dead in Las Vegas. Neither case has been solved.

Last week, the Los Angeles Times published an article by Chuck Philips, called "An Attack on Tupac Shakur Launched a Hip-Hop War." Citing new reports, Philips wrote that associates of Sean "Diddy" Combs were responsible for the first attack on Shakur, in Manhattan. In the last week, Combs cried fowlfoul, denying his involvement. Last night, the newspaper issued an apology. The documents on which the article centered, it seems, were fake, drafted by a con man. (The Smoking Gun dug deep into this story.)

David Folkenflik, NPR's media correspondent — and the ringleader of Talk of The Nation's "Media Circus" — will join us in the first hour, to talk about the Times story. If you have a question for him, leave it here.

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