Intervention : Blog Of The Nation It's dramatic, and it might save an addict's life... Intervention.
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Intervention

Intervention

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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When an addict reaches a point where nothing matters more than the drugs — not family, not personal safety, not money, not the future — bad things happen. Maybe a young addict living at home brings home drug dealers, whose volatile presence leaves the rest of the family with little else to do but lock themselves in a room and wait for the dealers to leave. Maybe an older addict, living alone, passes out in the kitchen with a glass in her hand, sprawled in shards. And it gets worse, of course. Watching a friend or family member self-destruct in the throes of addiction is absolutely horrific, but there may be an option for some: stage an intervention. Essentially, a family turns to a therapist or addiction specialist for help. They gather, lure their addicted loved-one to the room, and offer him or her the chance to get help to get clean. Now. Or face consequences. It's heart-wrenching, but it can work. Have you intervened... or been the subject of an intervention? Share your stories here.