Is There Room for Disagreement in the Military? : Blog Of The Nation With the early departure of Adm. William Fallon at the Pentagon, is there room for disagreement in the military?
NPR logo

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/88190718/88191312" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Is There Room for Disagreement in the Military?

Is There Room for Disagreement in the Military?

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/88190718/88191312" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Former US Central Command Chief Admiral William Fallon last year in Abu Dhabi. Source: AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Source: AFP/Getty Images

Here's a question: Should men and women in uniform criticize the country's policy on war? It's being asked again with the early retirement of Adm. William Fallon this week. He's been in open disagreement with the administration over Iran for months, and his interview in Esquire magazine may have been the last straw... He gave up his post as head of American forces in the Middle East. Obviously, this was a big debate during Vietnam, and more recently a handful of retired generals have spoken out against various aspects of the war in Iraq. But what about those still IN uniform? What are the limits on criticism from below? Is it different if you're a private or a general?