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Real Girls, Going Wild

Real Girls, Going Wild

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Spring break in Miami Beach. Source: tavopp hide caption

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Source: tavopp

Good grief, am I glad to be past spring break. I know it's the event college kids across the country hotly anticipate, waxing and tanning and sweating to prime their physiques for debauchery. To no one's surprise, I'm sure, I was far too... too something* to participate in this ritual during college. And, now, as a nearly-30 non-supermodel, I'd be far too intimidated to go. Spring Break's never been about sipping root beer floats and holding hands, but according to the Los Angeles Times's Meghan Daum, it's not just about getting drunk and hooking up, either: For young women, it's about confidence building.

Huh?

She hit Cancun for an article, and she found women defending what some might call raunch — wet t-shirt contests and worse — by explaining it was all about validation. In a Girls Gone Wild world it's no surprise, really, that this has happened, and I hate to be puritanical about it, but what?! It's just so foreign to me that I honestly can't get inside the head of those girls, and it's certainly not fair for me to judge them, so I want to know: If you're headed for spring break (or have just returned anytime in this decade), does what you did and — er, accomplished — there affect how you define yourself now?

*Nerdy? Hipster-y? Broke?