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Shamu's Life Lessons

Shamu's Life Lessons

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Can you teach your spouse how to back flip like this? Source: slimdandy hide caption

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Source: slimdandy

Shamu (v.): to use "the principles of animal training to solve a behavioral riddle" between humans.*

That's the subject of Amy Sutherland's new book What Shamu Taught Me About Life, Love, and Marriage: Lessons for People from Animals and Their Trainers. It builds off of an op-ed she wrote in the New York Times in June 2006 about her attempt to improve her relationship with her husband — and get him to pick up his dirty laundry — by using the techniques of exotic animal trainers. It became the newspaper's #1 most emailed article for the entire year. Today she joins us to talk about her methods, and what worked and what didn't. If you have questions for Amy, about animal training, or about how the techniques can be applied to human interactions, leave them here. And if you've ever shamued someone, we want details!

* That's right, she verbed a proper noun.

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