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What's Going on with All These Planes?

What's Going on with All These Planes?

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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AA planes got so grounded. Source: Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Source: Scott Olson/Getty Images

American Airlines and Delta grounded hundreds of planes today in order to perform safety maintenance re-inspections. This, two weeks after Southwest Airlines knowingly flew passengers on over 40 jets that hadn't undergone inspections. Not surprisingly, confidence in airline safety has waned as a result. Jim Hall, a former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, warns:

The safety we know in this decade is a result of a whole lot of accidents that occurred in the 1990s that were investigated and, because of them, changes were made in the system... If this [current] culture continues, then we could face another rash of accidents in this decade.

John Goglia, a former member of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, will join us today to answer our questions about plane safety and routine maintenance inspections. Got a question? Leave it here.