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Who Can in Texas?

Who Can in Texas?

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Showdown in Texas tomorrow... Who will Latinos support? Source: JOE RAEDLE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Source: JOE RAEDLE/AFP/Getty Images

Texas wraps up voting tomorrow, and the question on many minds comes down to this: How will Latinos vote? Hillary Clinton has a long-established relationship with the Latino community, and for a long time, pundits presumed she'd carry that demographic handily. But with chants of "Si se puede!*" ringing in our ears, we're all wondering if that's still true. On an issue like this, the most interesting perspectives can come from within, not without, so we've got Roland Roebuck, who believes Latinos won't vote for an African American because of historic tensions between Latinos and blacks; and Ricardo Ramirez, who says race isn't the problem, it's just that Clinton has a 16-year lead on her competitor. So if you're Latino, how do you see it? Who are you voting for... and why aren't you voting for his or her competitor?

*Interesting tidbit from the Wikipedia entry linked above — Sen. Obama has actually been using "Si se puede" as a catchphrase since 2004... I'd just assumed he adopted it after its prevalence during the 2006 immigration protests. Not so!

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