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A Digital Revolution In DC

A Digital Revolution In DC

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Let's see... There's Google, and Microsoft, and Apple, and online dating, of course. This country is plenty hi-tech. So how is it that Andrew Rasiej argues we're lagging behind when it comes to online government services?

In Estonia, for example, an official website called "Today I Decide," launched by the government press office, allows citizens to comment on draft laws and submit their own ideas for new ones. If a majority of online voters support a draft bill, it is forwarded to the relevant government department for review. Last fall in New Zealand, the government launched a wiki (a site that anyone can edit) to solicit citizen input on the wording of a new national Policing Act before it was formally introduced in parliament.

Add to that list France and England. Whether it's offering suggestions for new legislation, or just asking for voter's opinions, Rasiej says it's time for a digital revolution in Washington. Since we've come so far in using these internet tubes to ask for opinions, drop us a comment and let us know what government services you'd like to see online.