NPR logo

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90033130/90035546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
<em>Baghdad High</em>

Baghdad High

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90033130/90035546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The news headlines we see about Iraq often tend to be big picture. Violence is up or down. There are political comings and goings. There has been an increase or decrease in troop levels. That kind of thing.

It's much harder to get a picture of what life is like on a daily basis for Iraqis. The producers of a new documentary came up with one way to get at that story. They gave a group of high school seniors video cameras and trained them to shoot footage of their everyday lives.

The film, Baghdad High was screened at the Tribeca Film Festival last week, and it is scheduled to run on HBO in August.

One of the filmmakers, Laura Winter, is scheduled to talk with us today, to tell us how she got this project off the ground and what it was like working on a documentary remotely (she was not in Baghdad, and kept the filming secret for the safety of the students involved). We'll also talk with Ali, one of the students featured in the film. He now lives in the United States, but we'll only identify him by his first name for the safety of his family back in Iraq.