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Don't Dis My DNA

Don't Dis My DNA

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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There are laws on the books to protect us from discrimination based on race, religion, sex, and age. And soon we may see a law that bans discrimination based on genetic information. So, if you have a family history of breast cancer, for example, your insurance company can't refuse to cover you, or even charge you more. And your employer can't refuse to hire or promote you, and on the flip side can't fire you for it, either. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act passed the Senate last week by a vote of 95-0, and is scheduled for a vote in the House tomorrow. President Bush has already said he'd sign it. But, it's been a long 13 years for Rep. Louise Slaughter (D, NY). She's sponsored a similar bill every year since 1995, and joins us on the show today to talk about what it means, and to answer some of the criticisms about the bill. Is this an issue that's affected you? Have you avoided DNA tests for certain illnesses? Or if you run a small business, how will this bill likely affect you?

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