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Managing the Message

Managing the Message

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An article in the New York Times about the relationship between the media and the Pentagon has ruffled some feathers and uniforms. The David Barstow piece (read it here) alleges that many of the military analysts you see regularly on television, and hear on the radio, were given talking points by the Pentagon. One of these former officers was on contract with NPR News, which gives us a perfect opportunity to talk about the relationship — inside the Newseum, no less, whose mission is exactly to study these kinds of ethical questions that journalists face. Today, you'll hear Ken Silverstein, blogger and Harper's Washington editor, who has written regularly about the issue of the Pentagon and its so-called "surrogates." You'll also hear from Michael Goldfarb, blogger and online Weekly Standard editor, who participated in the Pentagon's "Bloggers Roundtable." Goldfarb argues that there's a sort of Casablanca effect here — the NYT is shocked, shocked to find that there are "Generals who know people at the Pentagon." Transparency is paramount here — let us know how you felt about the story. Brian Duffy, NPR's managing editor will be here to help us understand NPR's position in all this.