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The Story Behind The Story

The Story Behind The Story

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Slate.com ran an excerpt last month of Eric Lichtblau's new book, Bush's Law: The Remaking of American Justice. It gave a fascinating behind the scenes look at how the exclusive story of the NSA's warrantless wiretap program made it to the front page of the New York Times over the strong objections of the White House. To run the story, the administration argued, would be to seriously damage national security. In the end, the Times held the story for more than a year before running with it on December 16, 2005. Why did they run it? Why did they hold it? And how did the relationship between government and the press change in the months after 9/11? We'll ask Eric Lichtblau about it. And tell us what you think... send us your comments.