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Vonnegut's Back

Vonnegut's Back

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My love affair with Kurt Vonnegut started (as I'm sure it did for many of you) back in the 10th grade when I first experienced Billy Pilgrim, "unstuck in time." Since Slaughterhouse Five, I've made it a point to check back in with Vonnegut at various points in my life, most recently with A Man Without a Country. He died last year at the age of 84 — as Von would say, so it goes. But now, a posthumous collection of his stories and essays has been published. It's called Armageddon in Retrospect, and it focuses on none other than the experience of war. His son, Mark Vonnegut, wrote an introduction to the book, and he joins us today to talk about his father's writings. How will you remember Vonnegut, and what questions do you have for his son?