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A Harder Line

A Harder Line

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Last September, the Israeli Air Force bombed a site in Syria. The mission was veiled in secrecy. Was it retaliatory? A strike on Hezbollah? Israeli and American officials were silent. At press conferences, members of the Bush administration refused to answer questions about the attack, even as speculation grew that the jets had destroyed a clandestine nuclear facility. (You may remember that, in February, Seymour Hersh, of The New Yorker magazine, appeared on our program, to talk about his article, "A Strike in the Dark: What did Israel bomb in Syria?")

Just over a week ago, American officials announced that the IAF had bombed a nuclear site, built with North Korean assistance. They provided photographs, taken by the Central Intelligence Agency.

This weekend, the Los Angeles Times published an opinion piece by Leonard Spector and Avner Cohen, called "Cloak and stagger." Evidence that Iran and Syria have nuclear programs is there, they said, but we're not drawing obvious inferences, calling spades spades.

Do you think that the United States has taken, or is taking, a hard-enough line against Iran, Syria, and North Korea? Now that we've seen evidence, should we do more?

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