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Dispatches From Dictatorships

Dispatches From Dictatorships

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Back in 1995, when I was helping build the original website for The Christian Science Monitor, our first version of the site was built around one particular issue. Our then-correspondent, David Rohde had been taken prisoner by the Serbian regime of Slobodan Milosevic because David had broken the story of the massacres of Muslim men and boys at Srebrenica.

Rohde was eventually released but his detention illustrates the dangers that many foreign journalists face from the governments of the countries they cover. Recently we've seen evidence of this in Myanmar, where media organizations (including NPR) have decided not to identify reporters for fear they will be arrested and jailed by the military dictatorship.

And in countries like Cuba, North Korea and Sudan, foreign journalists find themselves accompanied by a "minder," which makes it very difficult to find any local citizens who are willing to be honest about the situation in their countries.

On today's show from the Newseum, we'll talk to reporters about what it's like to get the story under the ever watchful eyes of a dictatorship.

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