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The Temptation to Tell All

The Temptation to Tell All

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Very different workplace tell-alls... Public Affairs Books/Grand Central Publishing hide caption

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Public Affairs Books/Grand Central Publishing

By now you've probably heard... Former White House press secretary Scott McClellan has written a memoir about his years in the White House, and his boss? Well, he doesn't come off too well. Workplace memoirs — be they lightly fictionalized, a'la The Devil Wears Prada, thinly veiled a'la Confessions of a Video Vixen, or relatively straightforward — seem to flop only if they fail to dish the dirt. So, obviously, a contract with a fat advance is one of the reasons to write one, but why else? Maybe you want to set the record straight, or blow the whistle, or establish your place in history. And if you blog about your job, no matter how covertly, you're really doing it too. The only place I blog about my job is right here, in plain sight — how do you do it? And why?