Your Turn

Veteran Court In Buffalo — YOUR Turn

The Newseum.

The Newseum. Source: ktylerconk hide caption

itoggle caption Source: ktylerconk

Tomorrow, we're back at the Newseum, and we've got two shows for you — half special coverage, half TOTN regular style. First show is all about the world's longest homestretch in the Democratic nominating contest, but the second show is where we need your help.

This past January, Buffalo started a specialized veterans court — a court meant to address problems specific to veterans: like substance abuse, mental health, even traffic issues caused by PTSD or the simple lack of civilian driving skills. NPR's Libby Lewis has done the reporting on this, so we've invited her to the Newseum tomorrow to tell us about it — along with the project director for Buffalo's vet courts. Here's where you come in: if you're a vet and have been involved with the legal system, tell us your story. We want to hear about your experience — we're looking for personal stories, and we'd like to hear from you about what you (or a loved one) would want in a specialized court for veterans. And if you've participated in Buffalo's project, by all means, let us know that too.

AND: if you're in the Washington area (that means you, Baltimore, Falls Church, Richmond, etc!!), let us know if you want to attend the live broadcast for either hour. It's at the Newseum, which is gorgeous, and worth the trip even with out added TOTN bonus. It's free, fun, and you can see Neal and Ken live (both red-heads, btw) if you want to come for the two o'clock broadcast, and Libby Lewis at the three o'clock show (not a red-head, but super smart). Here's what to do.

To reserve your complimentary tickets, send an email to tickets@npr.org or call 202. 513. 3959. When reserving tickets, please indicate which show you would like to attend, 2-3, 3-4 or both. A post-show Q&A with our host, Neal Conan, can be arranged for school groups.

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