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Opinion Page: Don't Believe the Hype

Opinion Page: Don't Believe the Hype

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91810355/91812966" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Pakistani protesters at an anti-Karzai rally last week. Source: TARIQ MAHMOOD/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Source: TARIQ MAHMOOD/AFP/Getty Images

"Anti-American sentiment" is a phrase invoked so often, and by so many, that it is practically conventional wisdom — whether we are talking about the Middle East, or even Europe, or South America. Every year Pew pollsters release their global attitudes survey, and this year is no different — people really, really, dislike us. Enter perpetual contrarian Fouad Adjami — his Wall Street Journal oped expresses his own anti - anti - American theory (yes, that's a double negative, on purpose). Read the piece — and add your own arguments — below.