Lioness : Blog Of The Nation Women in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan: Lioness.
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Lioness

Lioness

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Lioness Sgt. Ranie Ruthig and Jessica Samuels in Ramadi. Source: Lloyd Francis Jr. hide caption

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Source: Lloyd Francis Jr.

Today we round out documentary-excitement-week with Lioness. It's the story of women in the Army in Iraq and Afghanistan — women who are barred from ground combat units, but serve in other units. By now we know that the frontlines are ill-defined on these fronts, so women end up in mortar attacks and firefights just like the men they serve alongside. As it turns out, there's a bit more to it. There's a group of women who actually go out on raids with the men. Known as Lionesses, they're invaluable to the combat units — they search women, handle children, and guard the typically un-armed translators, among other things. And now, they're the first female combat veterans. Lioness is their story, and two of the women and one of the filmmakers join us today.