NPR logo

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91695966/91698222" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Sandbagging

Sandbagging

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91695966/91698222" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Hogs, stranded on the roof of a farm in Oakville, Iowa. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Win McNamee/Getty Images

Floods continue to ruin farms and neighborhoods in the Midwest. Torrential downpours overflowed several of the tributaries that feed the Mississippi River, sweeping away soy and corn crops, and livestock.

People who live on or near the second-longest river in the United States worry that they could be next, that their homes and land could be flooded in the next few days. Many of them are relying on an antiquated system of levees. Already, several of the man-made embankments have failed.

At the end of our first hour, we want to hear from listeners who have been affected by the floods. People from Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana, particularly. Was your home, business, or farm flooded? What was ruined? What did you manage to save?

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.