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When Did Viruses Get To Be So Cool?

When Did Viruses Get To Be So Cool?

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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As of this morning, the above video had received 4,590,065 hits on YouTube. That's more than the sensational "Businessman Has Meltdown in Hotel Lobby" (not my title), or the super-hot super-catch by a ball girl in Fresno. I know what you're thinking — "Duh, girls in underpants are popular." That's true. They are. But girls in underpants who have the benefit of viral marketing are even more fun. (And that amazing catch in Fresno? Girl in a harness, and the whole thing was paid for by Gatorade.)

It's hard not to get the feeling that anyone can make a popular video — but the truth of the matter is, making something contagious takes a lot of thought — and a good strategy. Just ask the guys at 750 industries — a marketing firm that makes videos go viral. So, the question is — have you been laboring diligently to create your own Mentos masterpiece? And do you care if the video you love is a stealthy piece of advertising? (I don't. And I still really love those old-school Taster's Choice commercials. What's the difference?)

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