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Your City's Personality

Your City's Personality

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Boston is a magnet for college graduates. It's also a great place for young singles! Source: Paul Keleher hide caption

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Source: Paul Keleher

Conventional wisdom tells us that, nowadays, it doesn't matter where you live — you can prosper economically whether your reside in the Silicon Valley or the thick of the Rust Belt.

As the thinking goes, globalization and advances in technology have leveled the economic playing field, making the world "flat," so to speak. But author and economist Richard Florida argues that the world is actually more "spiky" than some may be willing to admit — innovation, finance and personality types tend to cluster in specific, centralized locations which he calls "mega-regions."

In his new book, Who's Your City?: How the Creative Economy Is Making Where to Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life, Florida charts out the personalities of various cities across the country, and shows how place is one of the biggest predictors of prosperity and overall happiness.

So if you're young and single, an empty nester, or about to retire... a budding entrepreneur, looking for adventure, or prize a sense of community above all else... look no further, Florida's got the place for you.

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And tell us, what's the personality of your city?