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Danke Schoen, Obama

Danke Schoen, Obama

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Senator Barack Obama spoke at the Victory Column in Berlin's Tiergarten today, to a sea of people numbering in the tens of thousands. The speech was only one part of his itinerary in a week-long tour of Europe and the Middle East. In it, Obama summoned a cross-Atlantic alliance, in which he called on Europeans and Americans, together, to "defeat terror and dry up the well of extremism that supports it." He went on to say, "The walls between old allies on either side of the Atlantic cannot stand." Today we'll talk to NPR's Ron Elving, and to the director of the German Marshall Fund in Berlin, Constanze Stelzenmuller, about what the speech means, and how Obama's image is shaping up abroad.

If you heard the speech, or have questions about how it was received here or in Europe, leave your comments here.