Guantanamo, From The Inside Out : Blog Of The Nation Journalist and lawyer Mahvish Khan writes about the sights, sounds, and people she met at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
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Guantanamo, From The Inside Out

Guantanamo, From The Inside Out

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92735787/92744945" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mahvish Khan is the American daughter of Afghan immigrants. As a law student at the University of Miami, she wanted to do something to help both her country, and her parents' country, after 9/11. She decided to put her Pashto-speaking skills and knowledge of Afghan culture to good use as an interpreter for defense attorneys representing men held at Guantanamo's detention center. After many visits to the camp, Mahvish began to see the detainees as more than mere numbers — they became her friends, and surrogate brothers and fathers — prisoner No. 1154 became Ali Shah Mousovi, detainee No. 1009 became Haji Nusrat. She chronicles their stories, and gives a detailed account of what Gitmo looks, tastes and smells like, in her new book, My Guantanamo Diary: The Detainees and the Stories They Told Me. If you have questions about what life is like for detainees and lawyers at Guantanamo Bay, leave them here.