NPR logo

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92332120/92334318" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
John Edwards

John Edwards

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92332120/92334318" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

??? (Rest assured. Guy will ask.) Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

It would be unfair to say that former Sen. John Edwards (D-NC) didn't get much traction in the Democratic primaries and caucuses. Sure, he usually came in third, behind Sens. Barack Obama (D-IL) and Hillary Clinton (D-NY), but parts of his platform, about domestic issues, especially, did resonate with Democratic voters. Many millions of them.

Edwards focused his attention on the economy and poverty. He launched — and finished — his campaign in New Orleans.

When Edwards stepped aside to let Obama and Clinton fight for the nomination, he told his supporters that his former opponents promised him "that they will make ending poverty central to their campaign for the presidency."

"And more importantly, they have pledged to me that as President of the United States they will make ending poverty and economic inequality central to their Presidency," he continued. "This is the cause of my life and I now have their commitment to engage in this cause. "

Now that Obama is the presumptive Democratic party's nominee for president, some pundits speculate that Edwards could be his running mate. He'll join us today, in the first hour of our program, to talk about the potential for an Obama/Edwards ticket. And to address many of the issues that compelled him to run for the Democratic nomination in the first place.

Did you support Edwards? What did you like about his platform? If you're a Democrat, has Obama kept his pledge to Edwards, to "make ending poverty central to [his] campaign for the presidency"? Should Obama ask Edwards to be his VP? To be his attorney general?