NPR logo

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/93800876/93801995" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
All That Glitters Is Not...Silver

All That Glitters Is Not...Silver

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/93800876/93801995" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

It ain't easy being silver... Source: Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Source: Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images

So you've won gold — good for you! You've won bronze — well done, you're a medalist! Silver.... eh... meh. Silver is the slighter sister of the medals, that somewhat middling ground that damns with faint sheen. A new study out of Cornell studied the reactions of medalists and found that silver medalists at the Olympics tend to compare themselves against athletes better off than they — while bronze medalists do the opposite, and compare themselves with people who did worse. Today, we're talking about why second place is so hard on people, and we want to hear from you — if you've won silver, or second, how did it feel?

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.