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Gulf Gold

Gulf Gold

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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An oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico. Source: Chris Graythen/Getty Images hide caption

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Source: Chris Graythen/Getty Images

With the sustained back-and-forth between Sens. McCain and Obama about offshore drilling for oil (McCain: "We have to begin the drilling." Obama: "That's not a strategy designed to end our energy crisis. It's a strategy designed to get politicians through an election."), there's plenty of speculation (har) on how and when digging new wells in the Gulf of Mexico would affect gas prices. Today we're leaving that debate, and instead talking about the reality of offshore oil production, and we're starting at square one. For example, producer Susan Lund straightened out our lingo in the morning meeting today, clarifying that once the well's been dug and it's operating, it's no longer a "rig," it's a platform. Thanks, Susan! So if you've got a room with a view of a platform, what's it like? Or maybe you're in Florida, trying to keep the rigs out of your vista — how come?

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