Hospitals 101 : Blog Of The Nation You can now check out the "death rates" at your local hospital on a government website, but what does that information really tell us, and is it the best way to pick a hospital?
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Hospitals 101

Hospitals 101

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Have you done your hospital homework? Source: katherine of chicago hide caption

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Source: katherine of chicago

We once had a guest on the show say that most people took more time to research a kitchen appliance than a hospital. Sad, but true - at least in my case. I've just never thought about it much. And if I need emergency care, I assume I'll be taken to the nearest ER. But there's more and more information available that makes it easier to compare hospitals. At a government site called (appropriately enough) Hospital Compare, you can check out services available, quality of care, and for the first time the survival rates for specific illnesses. Of course, it's best to do your homework now rather than later by Blackberry in the back of an ambulance. Any hints on what you do to research a hospital?