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Rich Man's World

Rich Man's World

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Rich people, beware. Jamie Johnson is publicly talking about money. Again. For the past few months, he has been chronicling the lives of the super-rich on Vanity Fair.com.

He writes that some old-money scions are welcoming the bumpy market because distinctions of wealth — Bentleys, jets and yachts — have been available to "new money." Johnson knows about this world — he is one of the heirs to the Johnson and Johnson pharmaceutical fortune.

Years ago, we saw him as a 20-something, talking to fellow heirs about (gasp!) money, in the documentary Born Rich. Earlier this year, his second film, The One Percent, turned the cameras on the vanguards of old-money establishment, questioning them on the growing chasm between rich and poor .

Today, we talk to Johnson about why money is a taboo topic of discussion and why he thinks the culture of WASPs is on the decline.