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I'm sure Wolves, Jackals, and Foxes: The Assassins Who Changed History is a fine book, I just haven't had the time to read it. What I did have time to do is peruse the appendix, and that is fascinating... What's the most common day of the week for assassinations? Friday. Most common months? April and November. What's the fate of assassins? Most are either caught or killed at the scene or captured later, but a plurality (38.9%) are never caught. And while most heads of state are assassinated in public, the most common place for the average Joe to be whacked is right in his own home. If the book is half as interesting as the appendix, I'll fly through it. What I'm not so sure of is this fascination with assassins... at the movies (Day of the Jackal, even Grosse Pointe Blank), in books, on TV, whatever. Why are so many of us so interested in assassins?

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