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The Economy: Judging The Coverage

The Economy: Judging The Coverage

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Where do you get your economic news? Source: KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Source: KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images

Up to date on the latest gas prices? You probably watch network TV news. Know everything there is to know about the housing crisis? You must be a fan of the newspaper. And if you feel like you're not getting enough coverage of the lousy economy, then you must be a fan of talk radio. This new study from the Project for Excellence in Journalism tracked media coverage of economic news, and found that while the economy is now a bigger story than the war in Iraq, it still follows a distant second to the presidential campaign. And, while 8 percent of all news stories focused on some aspect of the economy, the topics and type of coverage varied depending on whether you watch network news, cable news, or listen to the radio. Since many of you probably do some or all of the above, what economic stories do you want to see covered?

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